Coping with Death in Healthcare

 10_end_of_life_care

Blog post by Joseph Babaian    Chat Transcript from 10/13:    http://goo.gl/qkMFPG

Do not go gentle into that good night but rage, rage against the dying of the light.

– Dylan Thomas

I scrapped my planned blog this week at the last moment. Why? I read an inspiring call from my good friend @CancerGeek – he wrote, “What If – Fear or Love” and I highly recommend you check it out!

Andy said it all when he said this:

I choose to be vulnerable, to be creative, to share myself with the world, to take a stance, to have a voice

It reminded me of a pressing elephant in the room of all the work we do; that is, the end of life decisions that creep up on us in healthcare, those that fall into our laps, and those that come barging into the room like a hurricane.

I am not going to list all the current literature, all the best thinking, all the soft and obtuse ways I could approach this. Instead, I am going to ask the deep, connected, caring, & blisteringly intelligent #HCLDR community to read, think, and share their thoughts, beliefs, and hopes for making end of life something much more than we see, on average, today in healthcare.

I promise to stay off the soapbox, I know all of us see, feel, and hear this issue both intensely personally, professionally, and as a lingering concern that we often put to the back of our mind.

Some recent must reads to get you thinking:

“Death doesn’t come like it does in the movies:” What my mother’s last days taught me about our right to die.

– Rebecca Lanning in Salon.

To Die At Home, It Helps To Have Someone Who Can Take Time Off Work.

– Lynne Shallcross for NPR

My Father’s Shockingly Typical Death.

– Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH for Huffington Post

Let’s consider where we’ve been, where we are, where we need to be as well as the implications along with the #hcldr community of professionals, patients, clinicians, administrators, lurkers, counselors, social workers, designers, and advocates! Please join us on Tuesday October 13, 2015 at 8:30pm Eastern (for your local time click here) as we discuss the following topics:

  • T1: How broken is the current #eol system in terms of *palliative care? Suggestions?
  • T2: What’s your view on present skilled nursing and how it meets/doesn’t meet the needs of our most vulnerable? Solutions?
  • T3: What experiences do you have that have shown you a new way to handle #eol & treatments as #eol approaches?
  • T4: What can we do to #shift the model and recreate the #eol experience in a way that puts care front and center?

*Keep in mind, for Palliative Care, I am using this encompassing definition:

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of a serious illness—whatever the diagnosis.

Resources

“My Father’s Shockingly Typical Death” Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH, Huffington Post, Oct 09, 2015. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/randi-hutter-epstein/my-fathers-shockingly-typical-death_b_8269916.html

Accessed Oct 11, 2015

“To Die At Home, It Helps To Have Someone Who Can Take Time Off Work” Lynne Shallcross, NPR, Oct 9, 2015. http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/10/09/447115510/to-die-at-home-it-helps-to-have-someone-who-can-take-time-off-work

Accessed Oct 10, 2015

“ ‘Death doesn’t come like it does in the movies:’ What my mother’s last days taught me about our right to die” Rebecca Lanning, Salon, Oct 9, 2015. http://www.salon.com/2015/10/09/death_doesnt_come_like_it_does_in_the_movies_what_my_mothers_last_days_taught_me_about_our_right_to_die/

Accessed Oct 10, 2015

“What If – Fear Or Love” Andy DeLaO, WordPress, Oct 10, 2015. https://cancergeek.wordpress.com/2015/10/10/what-if-fear-or-love/

Accessed Oct 10, 2015.

Image Credit

End of Life Care – TEDMED

http://goo.gl/ATBYiB

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2 comments

  1. Michael Fratkin · · Reply

    Fantastic Joe!

    I’ll be there with bell’s on. I have a lot to say on this issue. I’ll also try to scare up a few visionary folks from the world of palliative care and hospice.

    Michael

    http://www.ResolutionCare.com 707-496-6846 cell

    (Sent from my pocket gizmo)

    >

  2. […] With Death in Health Care. [ HCLDR […]

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