What Secures Your Reputation?

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Blog post by Joe Babaian

It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently. ~ Warren Buffett

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This week on #hcldr let’s talk about something we all think about – sometimes directly, other times more passingly, but we all know it matters: our online reputation via our interactions and how that translates into our “real life”. Let’s be honest, during this entire pandemic and the final year of the prior US Administration, everyone has shed some layers of their protective cloaks and worked to share their authentic selves. This can work to burnish one’s reputation or detract from it – depends on the audience and the message. As always.

Warren’s comment about reputation doesn’t specify online or otherwise. It’s a truism and simply applies. We’ve seen how quickly real-world reputations can turn on the proverbial dime, and not always for the best. There is no safe harbor anymore for bad behavior. Now, for some, the need for a great reputation doesn’t apply – that might work for certain domains or even be par for the course (thinking fisticuffs politics or more).

Your reputation is based on something. What is that? Being authentic when it comes to your reputation means you don’t have ulterior motives, you aren’t selling something by pretending you’re not, you are not looking for quid pro quo, you are demonstrating the best of humanity in your interactions, and you are vulnerable as well as honest – inwardly and outwardly.

Please join me this week on the #hcldr tweetchat and dive into your reputation and consider all the implications for connections ranging between face-to-face and online. Be part of the conversation on Tuesday, February 9th at 8:30pm ET when we will be discussing:

T1: How does being authentic matter or is it more about appearing authentic? How does this impact your view of someone’s reputation?

T2: How might our hyper-connected society amplify good/bad behavior and how could this give more insight when looking for kindred spirits or communities in healthcare?

T3: Might the pressure to always be engaged create an untenable situation for individuals? How can we find balance and then connect with those that really do matter for the right reasons?

T4: Coming soon, how will more advanced technology work with human interactions to create authentic relationships based on more than current metrics of followers, sound bites, or echo-chamber “yes, I agree” reactions?

Photo by marcos mayer on Unsplash

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